Talking Corner

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As a little change from out Word of The Week, we’ve decided to share with you a few interesting words that you mightn’t have guessed to be real.

Spaghettification (noun), relating to physics.

“The process by which an object would be stretched and ripped apart by the gravitational forces of falling into a black hole.”

spaghettification


Isn’t this sweet! Kate sent home some handwriting practice with one of our prep students last week. Along with his numbers, she wrote a “Kate is Great” sentence that he didn’t realise was there until he read it aloud. When he came back with his work, he’d added two beautiful sentences of his own (with the help of his Mum, of course!) Naturally, we all agree!

~Chevy

Kate is Great


We hope you’ve all had a wonderful Mother’s Day!

mothersday

Word of the Week

Envervate 

(Adjective) Lacking energy or vitality; (verb) to weaken or wear down

Variations – enervated, enervating

Example: It’s such a relief that the enervating heat has finally started to settle.

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Word of the Week

Criticaster (noun)

A minor, inferior, or incompetent critic

Example: An important issue many criticasters seem to be overlooking is the fact that this new network is being run by just one man.

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Lest we forget – 100 years
Share your parade photos with us today.

anzac


Word of the Week

Flocculent – not to be confused with flatulent!

(adjective)
1. Having a wooly or fluffy appearance; fleecy; or
2. (chemistry) aggregated in wooly cloud-like masses; or
3. (biology) covered with tufts of flakes of a waxy of wool-like substance.

Variations – flocculence, flocculency (noun), flocculently (adverb)

Example: My mouth watered at the sight of my show bag full of soft, flocculent fairy floss.

There are a lot of options for this word folks, get your thinking caps on and let us know what creative ways you would put it in a juicy sentence!

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Word of the Week

Previse (verb): To know, or notify in advance, to predict or to foresee.

Variations – prevision (noun) & provisional (adjective)

‘She had the intelligence to previse the possible future’

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Word of the Week

Minacious (adjective): Menacing or threatening

Variations: Minaciously (adverb), minaciousness (noun), minacity (noun)

Example – ‘The barbaric tribe were known for their minacious village rampages’

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Bless our darling year 7 student, Miss J and her inspiring magnetic note left last week. It’s surely our pleasure to support our learners in their journeys to becoming lifelong learners with confidence!

Word of the Week

Ennui (noun): A very deep lack of emotional interest; disinterest, discontent, weariness or boredom; mental tiredness from not having anything exciting to do.

Example –

‘The whole country seems to be affected by the ennui of winter’

Don’t forget to send us your creative uses for this WotW!

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We are so very proud of one of our newest learners at the moment who is putting in a FANTASTIC effort and already showing improvement. This guy READ THREE STORIES yesterday! He is learning to hear the sounds in words and got 9/11 of his spelling words correct. Check him out completing one of the activities we did last week; his smile says it all! Master B, you’re smart, you’re fun, and you’re doing a fantastic job with learning!

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Word of the Week

Codswallop (noun): Nonsense

Example – I think that is a load of old codswallop.

CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it in the comments (or pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Word of the Week

Cahoots (noun): Questionable collaboration; secret partnership.

Example – A mysterious group of rich evildoers has been in apparent cahoots with aliens seeking to colonize the earth.

CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it in the comments (or pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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The day-to-day happenings in our Learning Studio

We had a new student start this week who was extremely nervous about coming and didn’t believe he would do well. We made this poster for him and the best thing about his session was hearing him exclaim to his dad as he went out the door at the end, “I did REALLY well!”
Well done Master J, we are all proud of your effort!

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Word of the Week

Bailiwick (adjective): One’s sphere of operation; an area of interest or skill.

Example – English must be his bailiwick, he received such good grades in that class.

CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Word of the Week

Agog (adjective): Full of intense interest or excitement; very eager or curious to hear or see something.

Example – Papa was agog with curiosity upon receiving a mystery box from the parcel man!

CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Brag Wall

Here is our brag wall for the week ending 22/2/15

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Congratulations to all our students and an extra high five to Mitch (a new student this week!), Patrick, Georgina, Rakaea, Amity, Blayze, Brayden, Madysen, and Jorga (outstanding effort Jorja!)


Word of the Week

 Tardy (adjective): Delaying or delayed beyond the right or expected time; late.

Variations – Tardily (adverb), tardiness (adjective)

Example – Please forgive the tardiness of this Word of the Week posting.
CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Word of the Week

Ostentatious
Pronounced: os•ten•ta•tious

(Adjective): characterised by pretentious or showy display; designed to impress others.
A display of wealth, knowledge etc., in a way that is meant to attract attention, admiration, or envy.

Synonyms: showy, pretentious, flamboyant, extravagant
Example – The little girl’s birthday party was an ostentatious affair with live ponies, a chocolate fountain, and a six-tier cake.

CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it in the comments (or pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

Ostentatious


Word of the Week

Caterwaul (noun): a shrill howling or wailing noise
Example – ‘The drinkers perform a comedic caterwaul while the folk singers create a dissonant background to the absurdity.’
Variations – Caterwauling
CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Word of the Week

Saunter (verb): to walk in a slow, relaxed manner

This week’s example comes from the writing work of one of our students, Master K.

Example – ‘The filthy brown beast, which was as big as a truck tyre, sauntered into the grubby kitchen waiting for his dinner.’
Variations – Cantankerously (adverb), Cantankerousness (noun).
CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

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Word of the Week

Cantankerous (adjective): bad tempered, argumentative and uncooperative.
Example – ‘He can be a cantankerous old fossil at times.’
Variations – Cantankerously (adverb), Cantankerousness (noun).
CHALLENGE: Use the word in an interesting sentence and post it on our Facebook page (or email/pm it to us). The sentence we choose as our favourite this week will receive a little something in the mail!

cantankerous

We love the use of Cantankerous in Hairy Maclary’s Rumpus at the Vets by Lynsey Dodd:

“There were miserable dogs,
cantankerous cats,
a rabbit with pimple,
and rickety rats.”

Can you come up with an interesting sentence or poem?

A video submission for our Word of the Week; thanks Malachai, we think your use of CANTANKEROUS was excellent (and by the sounds of it, Elias agrees!)


Writing

A writing activity with a twist today to help with motivation. We used the iPad and an app called Write About This (which is great for teachers by the way ; no ads, no social links, no in-app purchases) to get the creative juices going! Nice work Master C, I enjoyed your poem.

Calan write about it


Brag Wall

Here is our brag wall for the week ending 11/01/15

brag wall

We’re pretty impressed with the consistent effort put in by our learners in their first week back. Well done Diaz, Patrick, Daniel, Susie, Josie, Jorja, Brayden and Blayze!

Brag Wall

Here is our brag wall for the week ending 14/12/14

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Brag Wall

At the end of each daily session, students who achieve specific goals get to WRITE THEIR NAME ON THE WALL! – yes, it is the only wall students are actually encouraged to write on (thanks to some special whiteboard paint!). If they achieve more than one goal, their names goes up more than once. Here is our wall for the week ending 30/11/14

Brag Wall 30/11/14

Brag Wall 30/11/14

Well done to Patrick, Amity, Brayden, Eden, Blayze, Jorga, Josie, Susie and Taylor for your achievements this week!


One of our grade 8 students has just completed her foundation math course. When she started with us she showed plenty of potential but had many gaps in her knowledge and application. She began a structured foundation math course to fill these in. She was a student who wanted to improve but needed the right support to do so. Over the last 5 months she has completed 60 hours of Math work with us, gone through 4 years worth of structured Math curriculum, and achieved an A in her school Math assignment! She is now up to speed and is working 1 hour per week with Sharni on her classroom assignments so that she can continue to excel. This is a great example of short term sacrifice for long term gain!

She had an exam on Monday and this is the text I received from her Father:

“Hey Kate, T had her Math exam today and rung me after to say it was really easy! Pretty cool. Thanks for all your help with it.”


Very proud of Miss J who smashed out her essential sight word lists today. This is only one page out of three that she completed, and they all had this many ticks!

josie sight words


One of our younger learners is having difficulty with forming his letters. He is not yet able to see the finer details about shape and where they sit in the lines. We have pulled back a step to practice looking at finer detail in general. This teaches him to pay more attention to all of the visual information before teaching his brain and hand how to form the letters. For this activity he has to look at the picture and the recreate the shape. Attention has to be paid to not just which order the characters are in, but what way each one is facing, and exactly where they connect to each other. It is a fun way to challenge (and teach) his brain!

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Our new Speech Sound Pic cards are up on display in our studio! These are particularly well ordered and set out to help students decode words and sounds and really facilitate their learning in leaps and bounds!

We use them in conjunction with the duck hands strategy, so if your children come home with quacking hands you’ll know why!

ssp cards


One of our little learners practicing his name. He was also able to talk about there being another Jack in his class but that Jack had different letters in his last name. This is developing an understanding that letters form words, and words have meaning attached to them. Oh, and playing with pipe-cleaners is also FUN!

jack name


Have a read of Master 9’s descriptive writing piece. His task was to turn a boring sentence into a ‘movie in my mind’. This is about an hour and a half of guided writing (guided because we learnt about similes and built upon our previous work on how to make writing interesting), and an hour of editing. The editing involved finding spelling errors, using a dictionary (yes, the actual book!) to correct them, as well as looking at sound in words. I love this piece of writing and Master 9 is very proud of his efforts!

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Some food for thought:

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